This is a past event

Brisbane Festival and West Village present

Lost

3 - 25 Sept

Past Event
Lost

An enchanting wonderland of extinct and endangered floral illuminations will glow in the garden at West Village this September.

Created by Australian artist Amanda Parer, these large botanicals are a celebration of nature in its most beautiful forms, seemingly grown in place. The artist has been captivating audiences around the world with her larger-than-life installations, including the 40-feet humanoids which visited Brisbane for Brisbane Festival in 2017.

Lost creates a space where people are immersed in nature’s beautiful forms – a wondrous environment that allows visitors to reflect and play. Entry is free to see these rare and magical botanicals.


Price

Free

Times

Fri 3 Sept 4pm -10pm
Sun - Wed 12pm - 8pm
Thu - Sat 12pm - 10pm

Where

West Village ›
111 Boundary St,
West End QLD 4101

Accessibility

100% Visual content. No music or dialogue.

Wheelchair access

Important Info

Suitable for all ages

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"Imagine if an artist could take all the magic out of their paintings and transplant it into the real world where you get to experience it, not on a flat canvas, but all around you."

Scenestr

#Free workshops

Come down to West Village for free creative workshops alongside the artwork

Wearable Wonders

Wearable Wonders

Wander through the glorious Lost installation to find a workshop shed where you can make your own take home flower crown or insect masks. Children and families will up-cycle materials by folding, scrunching, finding and sticking together an assortment of wearable beauties to remind them of both the environmental impact and the floral beauty of Lost.

Saturdays 4, 11, 18 & 25th September 12 – 3pm
Sundays 5, 12, 19th September 1 - 4pm
Mon – Fri 20 – 24th September 1 – 4pm

The Common, West Village
Drop in – No Bookings Required
Recommended for 4+

Sense the Connection

Sense the Connection

Protect, respect and connect with your senses in this family friendly workshop hosted by first nations caretaker and chef Kieron Anderson (Quandamooka, Kullilli, Wakka Wakka).

Immerse yourself in sacred cultural knowledge as we learn to walk together as caretakers of this mother earth, all responsible for protecting our precious natural resources to prevent further endangering and extinction. Using theatrical storytelling, Kieron will guide families on a sensory exploration of the sights, sounds, smells, feelings and flavours of nature's beautiful forms.

Sat 11 & 18 September 3.30pm & 5pm
The Common, West Village
Bookings Required
45mins, recommended for 6+


#Featured flora

Pink and White - Philotheca Freyciana

Pink and White - Philotheca Freyciana

Located only in Tasmania, Australia
Endangered species

Philotheca Francina is restricted to the Freycinet Peninsula, Tasmania (predominantly on The Hazards Mountain Range), occurring from just above sea level to an altitude of 440 m. The species occurs exclusively on Devonian granite, growing in cracks and runnels within massive granite rocks.

This species is endangered as it has a very low number of mature individuals and occurs in a region where the soil pathogen Phytophthora cinnamomi (a soil-borne water mould that produces the condition of “root rot”) is known to occur.

Sources: Threatened Species Link + Department of Agriculture Water and The Environment

White Paper - Argentipallium Dealbatum

White Paper - Argentipallium Dealbatum

Native in Victoria and Tasmania, Australia
Rare and at risk

Argentipallium dealbatum is a species of perennial herb in the family Asteraceae and it is native to Australia. This white-paper everlasting is short-lived and there are currently no plants known from the wild. Due to its sensitivity and low number of available habitats its success remains sensitive to human influence.

Sources: Atlas of Living Australia and Encyclopedia of Life

Blue and White - Sagina Diemensis

Blue and White - Sagina Diemensis

Located only in Tasmania, Australia
Endangered species

Sagina diemensis is restricted to dolomite substrates in the Mount Anne region and the Weld River in Tasmania’s southwest.

Given the limited range of Sagina diemensis compared with the suitable habitat that it could potentially inhabit, it is likely that this species may occur as a relict population already impacted on by the effects of the changing global climate, and possibly by increased fire regimes resulting from human disturbance. The trend towards a warmer drier climate may therefore further threaten the species (loss of climatic habitat caused by anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases). Climate change is a threatening process listed on the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999.

Sources: Threatened Species Link

Middlemist’s Red - Unspecified Camellia

Middlemist’s Red - Unspecified Camellia

Originated from China
Endangered species

Middlemist’s Red is named after John Middlemist, who brought this flower from China to England in the early 19th century. The Middlemist Red is now extinct in the wild and there are just two Middlemist’s Red flowers in existence today. One of them is in New Zealand, while the other is in West London. It is likely that their appearance led to over-cultivation and its endangered status.

Sources: Avas Flowers and The Guardian

Showy Lady’s Slipper - Cypripedium reginae

Showy Lady’s Slipper - Cypripedium reginae

Located in North America
Endangered species

Showy lady’s slippers are the tallest native northern orchid and are known for their regal appearance, which has been nodded to through its name; the latin translation of reginae meaning “queen”. In the United States, showy lady’s slippers are listed as endangered, threatened, historical, exploitatively vulnerable, or special concern in 14 states.

Its increasing rarity is attributed to destruction of a suitable alkaline habitat; it is sensitive to hydrologic disturbances, and is threatened by wetland draining, water contamination, habitat destruction and horticultural collectors.

Source: United States Department of Agriculture

Salão - Aeonium gorgoneum

Salão - Aeonium gorgoneum

Located in Cape Verde, Africa
Endangered Species

The Aeonium gorgoneum, which is called Salão by the local population on the Cape Verde Islands, is a rare succulent that is vulnerable to over harvesting. Salão is often used in traditional medicine to treat coughs as well as other medical issues. According to the IUCN Red List, there are fewer than 1,000 Salão plants left in the wild in poorly maintained habitat but remains popular as a commercially traded species globally. Species potentially only perpetuating in trade and not in the wild.

Source: Rarest.org


#Partners

Where

West Village ›
111 Boundary St,
West End QLD 4101

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Brisbane Festival expresses deep respect to and acknowledges the First People of this Country.